Tag Archives: Getting Started

Google Vision API in R – RoogleVision

Using the Google Vision API in R

Utilizing RoogleVision

After doing my post last month on OpenCV and face detection, I started looking into other algorithms used for pattern detection in images. As it turns out, Google has done a phenomenal job with their Vision API. It’s absolutely incredible the amount of information it can spit back to you by simply sending it a picture.

Also, it’s 100% free! I believe that includes 1000 images per month. Amazing!

In this post I’m going to walk you through the absolute basics of accessing the power of the Google Vision API using the RoogleVision package in R. Continue reading

Face Detection in R

Face Detection in R

OpenCV is an incredibly powerful tool to have in your toolbox. I have had a lot of success using it in Python but very little success in R. I haven’t done too much other than searching Google but it seems as if “imager” and “videoplayR” provide a lot of the functionality but not all of it.

I have never actually called Python functions from R before. Initially, I tried the “rPython” library – that has a lot of advantages, but was completely unnecessary for me so system() worked absolutely fine. While this example is extremely simple, it should help to illustrate how easy it is to utilize the power of Python from within R. I need to give credit to Harrison Kinsley for all of his efforts and work at  PythonProgramming.net  – I used a lot of his code and ideas for this post (especially the Python portion).

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Data Visualization – Part 3

What Type of Data Visualization Do You Choose (if any)?

Determining whether or not you need a visualization is step one. While it seems silly, this is probably something everyone (including myself) should be doing more often. A lot of times, it seems like a great way to showcase the amount of work you have been doing, but winds up being completely ineffective and could potentially harm what you’re doing. Once you determine that you actually need to visualize your data, you should have a rough idea of the options to look at. This post will explain and demonstrate some of the common types of charts and plots.

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Should I Learn R or Python? … It Doesn’t Matter

Should I learn R or Python for data science?

I am asked this question regularly, both online and in person. There is a simple answer: it doesn’t matter. There are pros and cons to both which have been written about extensively so I won’t reinvent the wheel by making a list here (do a quick search in Google and you’ll find tens of thousands of relevant results).

The fact is, you’re asking the wrong question. Continue reading

Random Forest Classification of Mushrooms

There is a plethora of classification algorithms available to people who have a bit of coding experience and a set of data. A common machine learning method is the random forest, which is a good place to start.

This is a use case in R of the randomForest package used on a data set from UCI’s Machine Learning Data Repository.

Are These Mushrooms Edible? Continue reading